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Music / Tours / Bad World Tour

Bad World Tour

Bad World Tour: September 12th, 1987 - January 27th, 1989.

The Bad World Tour, was the first world concert tour by Michael Jackson as a solo artist, covering Japan, Australia, United States and Europe from September 12, 1987 to January 27, 1989. The tour, sponsored by Pepsi Cola and spanning 16 months, included 123 concerts to 4.4 million fans across 15 countries. When the tour concluded it grossed a total of $125 million, adding two new entries in the Guinness Book of World Records for the largest grossing tour in history and the tour with the largest attended audience. In the United States alone, where just 54 concerts were held, the tour came in as the 6th largest grossing tour from 1988–89, grossing a total of $20.3 million.

In April 1989, the tour was nominated for "Tour of the Year 1988" at the inaugural International Rock Awards. The tour lost to Amnesty International, but nothing could detract from the fact that Jackson's first solo tour was the largest and most successful in history.

At every concert (at least in the United States) Jackson made sure that 400 tickets were reserved for underprivileged children. These tickets were distributed across hospitals, orphanages and charities. Jackson also donated concert takings to multiple causes.

1987: First leg (Japan and Australia)

The release of Jackson's seventh solo album, 'Bad', on August 31, 1987 led to a huge rise in popularity for Jackson in Japan, with Jackson being nicknamed "Typhoon Michael". Other popular artists such as George Michael and Madonna had similarly begun their solo world tours in Japan, as it was seen as the ideal place for the last "live dress rehearsal". The Japanese press only idolise their artists, unlike the tabloids seen in the United Kingdom where they are most popular. When Jackson's Japan Airlines Flight 61 touched down at Narita International Airport in Tokyo over 600 journalists, cameramen and hundreds of screaming fans were waiting to cover his arrival. Even Bubbles, Jackson's pet chimp, who took a separate flight, was greeted by more than 300. To transport the stage equipment, a chartered jumbo jet [disambiguation needed] flew into Tokyo carrying 22 truckloads along with Jackson's tour entourage of 132 people.

During this leg Michael wore a silver, red or black shirt with a black bolted strap going diagonally across it, as well as some trousers with over 30 buckles, as well as a giant silver belt. The reason he wore silver, red and black in this leg was because he wanted to experiment to see what colour he liked the best. He decided on silver, so he wore silver for every concert in the second leg.

While Jackson was in Tokyo, Australian pop music critic Molly Meldrum flew in to record a world exclusive one hour television special with Jackson and Frank Dileo, his then-manager, which was later featured on '60 Minutes' in the United States. Whist performing in Osaka, Jackson met with then-Mayor Yasushi Oshima to receive the Key to the City. Jackson also brought along Bubbles, the first animal allowed inside the Osaka Town Hall. It was also in Osaka where Jackson announced the dedication of his Japanese tour and each performance of 'I Just Can't Stop Loving You' to Yoshioka Hagiwara, a 5 year old boy who was kidnapped and murdered. Jackson gave £12,000 to the parents of Hagiwara.

The total attendance for the concerts in Japan (14 in total) during the first leg was 450,000 with performances in Tokyo, Osaka and Yokohama. Previously, performers only managed to draw a crowd of 200,000 on a single tour. A granddaughter of Emperor Hirohito attended the first concert in Tokyo.

After the first fourteen concerts in Japan, the tour went to Australia with five concerts with performances in Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane. Similar to that of Japan, the Australian press were naming Jackson "Crocodile Jackson". When he was not performing, Jackson spent time visiting sick children at their homes in the suburbs in Sydney, where in one instance he actually put children to bed after a plea from their mothers over the phone. It was also in Sydney on November 20, 1987 where Stevie Wonder made a surprise appearance at a concert to perform 'Just Good Friends', accompanied by Wade Robson.

Due to various reasons, scheduled concerts in Wellington and Auckland in New Zealand were cancelled.

1988/1989: Second leg (United States, Japan and Europe)

A helicopter shot of the last concert of the European tour at the Aintree Racecourse, Liverpool with 125,000 in attendance, the largest attended concert of the tour Before the tour even kicked off, new costumes and stage effects were in production for the second leg. This was due to the lack of preparation time Jackson had, whereby many aspects of the first leg resembled the 1984 Victory Tour by The Jacksons. For this Jackson changed his costume, switching the silver, black or red shirt with a black bolted strap and multiple leg buckles for a silver zipper with multiple black buckles down his arms and white undershirt. Accessories including a belt, arm badge, and shoulder and leg buckles also varied. One of Jackson's entourage commented that Jackson "thought he was wearing too much leather back then [during the first leg] and looked a bit ridiculous". "So he grew his hair, threw away his jacket and strapped on a massive belt. The result makes him look raw and street-wise." Rehearsals for the tour's second leg took place at the Pensacola Civic Center in Florida, from January 22 to February 18, 1988. During an interview for a Kansas news report, Jacksons stated, "We are starting all over again with the American tour. We are building a new show with new sets, staging and new songs." The first set of concerts in the United States were to begin in Atlanta, Georgia, yet Pepsi officials objected as the city is home to rival drinks company Coca-Cola.

On March 3, 1988 – Jackson performed a private concert at Madison Square Garden, New York City where all proceeds were donated to the United Negro College Fund. Tickets for the concert could not be purchased at regular box offices, as a special lottery system determined ticket receivers. Tatiana Thumbtzen, who was featured in the video for 'The Way You Make Me Feel,' kissed Jackson during the song's performance. The incident created further stories on Jackson and Thumbtzen's relationship. Siedah Garrett, who provided vocals for 'I Just Can't Stop Loving You' on 'Bad' and co-wrote 'Man In The Mirror' also made a special appearance. While touring the states, the 2 performances in St. Louis, Missouri had to be cancelled due to Jackson suffering from laryngitis after catching a cold. For both concerts in Atlanta, Georgia, Jackson gave 100 tickets to the Children's Wish Foundation for terminally ill children.

Following the United States, the tour went to Europe with the opening concert in Rome, Italy on May 23, 1988. Just hours before the concert began, Jackson sneaked out the back of the Lord Byron Hotel where he was staying, dressed in a curly haired wig, false moustache and raincoat to walk around the streets alone. This created a panic amongst his security. Jackson was then found returning to the hotel on his own in a taxi. While in Rome, Jackson donated £100,000 to the Bambino Gesù Hospital, the leading children's hospital in Italy. Performances in Italy were held in Rome and Turin.

The concert in Basel, Switzerland on June 16, 1988 was attended by Elizabeth Taylor and Bob Dylan. While in Basel, Jackson met with Oona O'Neill, widow of Charlie Chaplin, one of Jackson's all-time heroes. The two concerts in Gothenburg, Sweden on June 11 and June 12, 1988 were scheduled at the Ullevi Stadium but it was under repair. Instead the concert was held at Gothenburg's shipyard in Eriksberg. While touring in Europe, Jackson would be given the names "The Earl of Whirl" and "The Peter Pan of Pop."

The concerts in the United Kingdom, particularly at the original Wembley Stadium in London were the most anticipated and eagerly awaited by fans of the whole tour. Partly due to this was that ideas of concerts by The Jacksons in the United Kingdom in 1984 were ultimately cancelled. Anthony Davis, a member of the tour's security staff, said that fans in London "have waited so long for the show" in which "the anticipation level creates mass hysteria." Tickets for the initial 5 July dates went on sale in January, with ticket demand exceeding 1.5 million, enough to sell-out the 72,000 capacity venue 20 times. The first concert on July 14, 1988 was attended by numerous celebrities including Shirley Bassey, Jack Nicholson and Frank Bruno. Two days later on July 16, Diana, Princess of Wales and Prince Charles were in attendance. Jackson met them both prior to the concert in which he donated $450,000 to the Prince's Trust and the Great Ormond Street Hospital. Jackson also presented a special tour jacket and display of Jackson's solo albums 'Bad', 'Thriller' and 'Off The Wall' to the royal children. The concerts at Wembley earned Jackson a third entry into the Guinness World Records from the tour alone on September 8, 1988. The seven sold out shows were attended by a total of 504,000. Management of the stadium presented Jackson with the award which was previously held by Genesis, with 4. Until the demolition of the stadium in 2003, this record remained unbroken.

During the United Kingdom tour, Jackson performed in Leeds on August 29, 1988 on his 30th birthday. The fans sang "Happy Birthday to You" before 'Another Part Of Me'. An incident occurred during the concert where a pilot was "being hunted" by police after flying a plane above the crowd of 90,000 below 200 feet. No one was injured, although 96 were arrested mostly from drunkenness and some for damage and drug offences. After the concert, Jackson donated $130,000 to Give For Life, a British charity that was aiming to raise $1.9 million towards an immunisation programme for 40,000 children. The last concert on the United Kingdom and European tour altogether was one that Jackson was eagerly anticipating. "I have always considered Liverpool the home of contemporary pop music", he told reporters. "By virtue of its being the birth place of the incomparable Beatles." The concert, which took place at the Aintree Racecourse, resulted in hundreds of fans being treated by the St. John Ambulance service for passing out, fainting, headaches, hysteria and being crushed amongst the crowd of 125,000, the largest concert of the tour. The amount of ground used covered the first three jumps in the Grand National.

During August 1988, after performing 5 of the 7 concerts in London, Jackson and his crew stayed at the £50,000 per week Incosol Health Spa in Marbella, Spain to help them be in top shape for the rest of the tour. Jackson's health regime included mountain treks, gym sessions and underwater massages.

After a total 41 concerts in Europe, the tour went to the United States for its second run in 1988, performing in 7 more cities. The tour was initially planned to end on Boxing Day, 1988 in Tokyo but Jackson suffered from swollen vocal chords after the first of 6 scheduled concerts in Los Angeles, California in November. The remaining 5 were then rescheduled for January 1989. A further 9 concerts at the Tokyo Dome (replacing the old Korakuen Stadium where Jackson performed in 1987) were performed, totaling the Japanese tour attendance to 570,000 across 23 concerts, including two on Christmas Day and Boxing Day. The final 5 concerts at the Memorial Sports Arena in Los Angeles were performed to conclude the tour. For the last concert on January 27, 1989 Jackson donated more than £700,000 of the concert's takings to Childhelp, an organisation fighting child cruelty and dedicated the "Motown Medley" performance to Berry Gordy, founder of Motown Records.

Jackson's five performances in Los Angeles would mark the last time he toured the continental United States. (However, later tours did go to Mexico and Hawaii, and he did do several TV appearances in the USA during the final two decades of his life.)

Set list First Leg (1987)

1. Wanna Be Startin' Somethin'
2. Things I Do for You
3. Off the Wall
4. Human Nature
5. This Place Hotel
6. She's Out of My Life
7. Motown Medley: I Want You Back / The Love You Save / I'll Be There
8. Rock with You
9. Lovely One
10. Interlud
11. Workin' Day and Night
12. Beat It
13. Billie Jean
14. Shake Your Body (Down to the Ground)
15. Thriller
16. I Just Can't Stop Loving You
17. Bad

Set list Second Leg (1988-1989)

1. Wanna Be Startin' Somethin'
2. Heartbreak Hotel (This Place Hotel)
3. Another Part Of Me
4. I Just Can't Stop Loving You
5. She's Out of My Life
6. Motown Medley: I Want You Back / The Love You Save / I'll Be There
7. Rock With You
8. Human Nature
9. Smooth Criminal
10. Dirty Diana
11. Thriller
12. Interlude
13. Workin' Day and Night
14. Beat It
15. Billie Jean
16. Bad
17. The Way You Make Me Feel
18. Man In The Mirror

Tour dates:

First leg (September 12 to November 28, 1987)

1. September 12, 1987 Tokyo - Japan / Tokyo Dome / Attendance 45,000
2. September 13, 1987 Tokyo - Japan / Tokyo Dome / Attendance 45,000
3. September 14, 1987 Tokyo - Japan / Tokyo Dome / Attendance 45,000
4. September 19, 1987 Osaka - Japan / Nishinomiya Stadium / Attendance ?
5. September 20, 1987 Osaka - Japan / Nishinomiya Stadium / Attendance ?
6. September 21, 1987 Osaka - Japan / Nishinomiya Stadium / Attendance ?
7. September 25, 1987 Yokohama - Japan / Yokohama Stadium / Attendance 38,000
8. September 26, 1987 Yokohama - Japan / Yokohama Stadium / Attendance 38,000
9. September 27, 1987 Yokohama - Japan / Yokohama Stadium / Attendance 38,000
10. October 3, 1987 Yokohama - Japan / Yokohama Stadium / Attendance 38,000
11. October 4, 1987 Yokohama - Japan / Yokohama Stadium / Attendance 38,000
12. October 10, 1987 Osaka - Japan / Osaka Stadium / Attendance ?
13. October 11, 1987 Osaka - Japan / Osaka Stadium / Attendance ?
14. October 12, 1987 Osaka - Japan / Osaka Stadium / Attendance ?
15. November 13, 1987 Melbourne - Australia / Olympic Park / Attendance 45,000
16. November 20, 1987 Sydney  - Australia / Paramatta Stadium / Attendance 45,000
17. November 21, 1987 Sydney  - Australia / Paramatta Stadium / Attendance 45,000
18. November 25, 1987 Brisbane  - Australia / Entertainment Centre / Attendance 67,500
19. November 28, 1987 Brisbane - Australia / Entertainment Centre / Attendance 67,500

Second leg (February 23, 1988 to January 27, 1989)

20. February 23, 1988 Kansas City - Missouri, USA / Kemper Arena / Attendance 16,960
21. February 24, 1988 Kansas City - Missouri, USA / Kemper Arena / Attendance 16,960
22. March 3, 1988 New York City - New York, USA / Madison Square Garden / Attendance 19,000
23. March 4, 1988 New York City - New York, USA / Madison Square Garden / Attendance 19,000
24. March 5, 1988 New York City - New York, USA / Madison Square Garden / Attendance 19,000
25. March 12, 1988 St. Louis - Missouri, USA / The Arena / Attendance 18,000
26. March 13, 1988 St. Louis - Missouri, USA / The Arena / Attendance 18,000
27. March 18, 1988 Indianapolis - Indiana, USA / Market Square Arena / Attendance 45,000
28. March 19, 1988 Indianapolis - Indiana, USA / Market Square Arena / Attendance 45,000
29. March 20, 1988 Louisville - Kentucky, USA / Freedom Hall / Attendance 36,000
30. March 23, 1988 Denver  - Colorado, USA / McNichols Arena / Attendance 20,125
31. March 24, 1988 Denver  - Colorado, USA / McNichols Arena / Attendance 20,125
32. March 30, 1988 Hartford - Conneticut, USA / Civic Center / Attendance 15,060
33. March 31, 1988 Hartford - Conneticut, USA / Civic Center / Attendance 15,060
34. April 1, 1988 Hartford - Conneticut, USA / Civic Center / Attendance 15,060
35. April 8, 1988 Houston - Texas, USA / The Summit / Attendance 40,000
36. April 9, 1988 Houston - Texas, USA / The Summit / Attendance 40,000
37. April 10, 1988 Houston - Texas, USA / The Summit / Attendance 40,000
38. April 13, 1988 Atlanta - Georgia, USA / The Omni / Attendance 30,000
39. April 14, 1988 Atlanta - Georgia, USA / The Omni / Attendance 30,000
40. April 15, 1988 Atlanta - Georgia, USA The Omni / Attendance 30,000
41. April 19, 1988 Chicago - Illinois, USA / The Rosemont Horizon / Attendance 40,000
42. April 20, 1988 Chicago - Illinois, USA / The Rosemont Horizon / Attendance 40,000
43. April 21, 1988 Chicago - Illinois, USA / The Rosemont Horizon / Attendance 40,000
44. April 25, 1988 Dallas - Texas, USA / The Reunion Arena / Attendance 39,000
45. April 26, 1988 Dallas - Texas, USA / The Reunion Arena / Attendance 39,000
46. April 27, 1988 Dallas - Texas, USA / The Reunion Arena / Attendance 39,000
47. May 4, 1988 Minneapolis - Minnesota, USA / Metropolitan Center / Attendance 16,890
48. May 5, 1988 Minneapolis - Minnesota, USA / Metropolitan Center / Attendance 16,890
49. May 6, 1988 Minneapolis - Minnesota, USA / Metropolitan Center / Attendance 16,890
50. May 23, 1988 Rome - Italy / Flaminio Stadium / Attendance 70,000
51. May 24, 1988 Rome - Italy / Flaminio Stadium / Attendance 70,000
52. May 29, 1988 Turin - Italy / Delle Alpi / Attendance 53,600
53. June 2, 1988 Vienna - Austria / Prater Stadium / Attendance 55,000
54. June 5, 1988 Rotterdam - The Netherlands / Feyenoord Stadium / Attendance 48,400
55. June 6, 1988 Rotterdam - The Netherlands / Feyenoord Stadium / Attendance 48,400
56. June 7, 1988 Rotterdam - The Netherlands / Feyenoord Stadium / Attendance 48,400
57. June 11, 1988 Gothenburg - Sweden / Eriksburg Shipyard / Attendance 53,000
58. June 12, 1988 Gothenburg - Sweden / Eriksburg Shipyard / Attendance 53,000
59. June 16, 1988 Basel - Switzerland / Saint Jakobs Stadium / Attendance 50,000
60. June 19, 1988 Berlin - Germany / Reichstag, Berlin Wall / Attendance 50,000
61. June 27, 1988 Paris - France / Parc des Prince / Attendance 64,000
62. June 28, 1988 Paris - France / Parc des Prince / Attendance 64,000
63. July 1, 1988 Hamburg - Germany / Volkspark Stadium / Attendance 50,000
64. July 3, 1988 Cologne - Germany / Mungersdorfer Stadium / Attendance 70,000
65. July 8, 1988 Munich - Germany / Olympic Stadium / Attendance 72,000
66. July 10, 1988 Hockenhiem Nr Frankfurt - Germany / Mungersdorfer Stadium / Attendance 70,000
67. July 14, 1988 London - England, U.K. / Wembley Stadium / Attendance 72,000
68. July 15, 1988 London - England, U.K. / Wembley Stadium / Attendance 72,000
69. July 16, 1988 London - England, U.K. / Wembley Stadium / Attendance 72,000
70. July 22, 1988 London - England, U.K. / Wembley Stadium / Attendance 72,000
71. July 23, 1988 London - England, U.K. / Wembley Stadium / Attendance 72,000
72. July 26, 1988 Cardiff - Wales, U.K. / Cardiff Arms Park / Attendance 55,000
73. July 30, 1988 Cork - Ireland / Pairc Ui Caoimh / Attendance 60,000
74. July 31, 1988 Cork - Ireland / Pairc Ui Caoimh / Attendance 60,000
75. August 5, 1988 Marbella - Spain / Municipal Stadium / Attendance 28,000
76. August 7, 1988 Madrid - Spain / Vincent Calderon Stadium / Attendance 60,000
77. August 9, 1988 Barcelona - Spain / Nou Camp / Attendance 45,000
78. August 11, 1988 Nice - France / Stade Charles Ehrmann / Attendance 35,000
79. August 14, 1988 Montpellier - France / Stade Richter / Attendance 35,000
80. August 19, 1988 Lausanne Stadium Pontaese / Attendance 45,000
81. August 21, 1988 Wurzburg - Germany / Talavera Wiesen / Attendance 43,000
82. August 23, 1988 Werchter - Belgium / Festival Ground / Attendance 55,000
83. August 26, 1988 London - England, U.K. / Wembley Stadium / Attendance 2,000
84. August 27, 1988 London - England, U.K. / Wembley Stadium / Attendance 72,000
85. August 29, 1988 Leeds - England, U.K. / Roundhay Park / Attendance 90,000
86. September 2, 1988 Hannover - Germany / Niedersachsen Stadium / Attendance 40,000
87. September 4, 1988 Gelsenkirchen - Germany / Park Stadium / Attendance 52,000
88. September 6, 1988 Linz - Austria / Linz Stadium / Attendance 40,000
89. September 10, 1988 Milton Keynes  - England, U.K. / The Bowl / Attendance 60,000
90. September 11, 1988 Liverpool - England, U.K. / Aintree Racecourse / Attendance 125,000
91. September 26, 1988 Pittsburg - Pennsylvania, USA / Civic Arena / Attendance 16,230
92. September 27, 1988 Pittsburg - Pennsylvania, USA / Civic Arena / Attendance 16,230
93. September 28, 1988 Pittsburg - Pennsylvania, USA / Civic Arena / Attendance 16,230
94. October 3, 1988 Rutherford - New Jersey, USA / East Meadowland Arena / Attendance 20,350
95. October 4, 1988 Rutherford - New Jersey, USA / East Meadowland Arena / Attendance 20,350
96. October 5, 1988 Rutherford - New Jersey, USA / East Meadowland Arena / Attendance 20,350
97. October 10, 1988 Richfield - Cleveland, Ohio, USA / Coliseum / Attendance 19,000
98. October 11, 1988 Richfield - Cleveland, Ohio, USA] Coliseum / Attendance 19,000
99. October 13, 1988 Landover - Maryland, USA] Capitol Center / Attendance 17,470
100. October 17, 1988 Landover - Maryland, USA / Capitol Center / Attendance 17,470
101. October 18, 1988 Landover - Maryland, USA / Capitol Center / Attendance 17,470
102. October 19, 1988 Landover - Maryland, USA / Capitol Center / Attendance 17,470
103. October 24, 1988 Rochester - Detroit, Michigan, USA / Palace of Auburn Hills / Attendance 16,670
104. October 25, 1988 Rochester - Detroit, Michigan, USA / Palace of Auburn Hills / Attendance 16,670
105. October 26, 1988 Rochester - Detroit, Michigan, USA / Palace of Auburn Hills / Attendance 16,670
106. November 7, 1988 Irvine - California, USA / Irvine Meadows Amphitheater / Attendance 15,000
107. November 8, 1988 Irvine - California, USA / Irvine Meadows Amphitheater / Attendance 15,000
108. November 9, 1988 Irvine - California, USA / Irvine Meadows Amphitheater / Attendance 15,000
109. November 13, 1988 Los Angeles - California, USA / Sports Arena / Attendance 18,000
110. December 9, 1988 Tokyo - Japan / Tokyo Dome / Attendance 45,000
111. December 10, 1988 Tokyo - Japan / Tokyo Dome / Attendance 45,000
112. December 11, 1988 Tokyo - Japan / Tokyo Dome / Attendance 45,000
113. December 17, 1988 Tokyo - Japan / Tokyo Dome / Attendance 45,000
114. December 18, 1988 Tokyo - Japan / Tokyo Dome / Attendance 45,000
115. December 19, 1988 Tokyo - Japan / Tokyo Dome / Attendance 45,000
116. December 24, 1988 Tokyo - Japan / Tokyo Dome / Attendance 45,000
117. December 25, 1988 Tokyo - Japan / Tokyo Dome / Attendance 45,000
118. December 26, 1988 Tokyo - Japan / Tokyo Dome / Attendance 45,000
119. January 16, 1989 Los Angeles - California, USA / Sports Arena / Attendance 18,000
120. January 17, 1989 Los Angeles - California, USA / Sports Arena / Attendance 18,000
121. January 18, 1989 Los Angeles - California, USA / Sports Arena / Attendance 18,000
122. January 26, 1989 Los Angeles - California, USA / Sports Arena / Attendance 18,000
123. January 27, 1989 Los Angeles - California, USA / Sports Arena / Attendance 18,000

Bad Tour Ticket

Performers:

Lead performer
Vocals, Dance, Choreographer: Michael Jackson

Dancers

LaVelle Smith Jnr, Evaldo "Eddie" Garcia, Randy Allaire, Dominic Lucero

Band members:

Musical Director: Greg Phillinganes
Assistant Musical Director: Kevin Dorsey
Keyboards: Greg Phillinganes, Rory Kaplan
Synclavier, Synthesiser, Digital Guitar, Sound Effects: Christopher Currell
Drums: Ricky Lawson
Guitars: Jennifer Batten, David Williams
Bass: Don Boyette
Vocal Director: Kevin Dorsey
Vocals: Kevin Dorsey, Dorian Holley, Darryl Phinnesse, Sheryl Crow

Credits:

Tour Coordinator: Sal Bonafede
Tour Manager: John Draper
Production Manager: Benny Collins
Production Coordinator: Nelson Hayes
Stage Manager: Gerry Bakalian
Set Construction: Tait Towers, Inc.
Attorneys: Ziffren, Brittenham and Branca
Business Management: Gelfand, Rennert and Feldman
Public Relations: Solters/Roskin, Friedman Inc.
V.P. of Communications, MJJ: Bob Jones
Media Relations, Epic Records: Glen Brunman
Tour Advertising & Promotion: Lyon/Stinson [Entertainment Marketing, Inc.]
Travel Agent: Gretta Walsh Of Revel Travel

Staff:

Assistant to Michael Jackson: Jolie Levine
MJJ Productions Staff: Miko Brando, Lizabeth Gilbert
Assistant to Mr Dileo: Meredith Besser
TTC Staff: Sheila Copeland
Assistant to Mr Jones: Ron Carter
Executive Director of MJJ Productions: Bill Bray

Tour Support:

Merchandising: Peter Lubin, Brockum
Tourbook Design: Reiner Design Consultants
Photos By: Sam Emerson
Special Thanks: Kenny Rogers

Special Thanks:

Pepsi Cola
Pepsi Representative Aaron Walton
Epic Records

Very Special Thanks to Yamaha


Copyright ©2002 Billie Jean, All rights reserved
Website design by webmaster Dirk

Updated: 02/02/2009 5:26 AM

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